Modern governments and the politician

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dc.contributor.author Biddison, John Jeremiah
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-20T21:51:35Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-20T21:51:35Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/37654
dc.description Citation: Biddison, John Jeremiah. Modern governments and the politician. Senior thesis, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904.
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Men have from the beginning congregated together- Man is by nature gregarious animal- and, since he is endowed with mind and soul, so that he may know what is right and what is an injustice to his fellow man, he has of necessity instituted laws to define his rights and governments to protect them. At first the articles which defended the man of low estate were few and the respect for them small; the strong have ridden rough–shod over the weak; but times have changed, and with them governments. In the modern government, the people rule and kings are told what to do. The modern Government is a creation of the past century; yet not all governments of today are modern, not all civilized governments are modern, not all the governments of Europe are modern. A modern government, in the sense I propose to use it, is one in which the people at large are the prevailing power. In that sense the United States government is modern; so is that of England and France and all the republics; Germany is only Partially so, and Russia is not modern. In a nation ruled by the people, another institution commonly, if not always, becomes a party of its vital workings --that is the political party.. The party must have leaders; hence the politician--" one attached to politics as managed by parties"; " one skilled in political science and administration. " Political parties, naturally, exist only in democratic countries, since it is as organ of public opinion. The nearest approach to a party, in a despotism, is the political faction; it is the forerunner of the party. England's history was made by factions from the time of the Magna Charta up to the time of the Puritans, about 1640; but these factions did not depend…
dc.rights Public Domain Mark 1.0
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/
dc.subject Political Systems
dc.subject Democracy
dc.subject Politics
dc.subject Politicians
dc.subject Government
dc.subject Political Evolution
dc.title Modern governments and the politician
dc.type Text
dc.date.published 1904
dc.subject.AAT Theses


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