Livestock Feeders' Day, 1960

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  • ItemOpen Access
    The value of enzymes added to cattle rations
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W.
    Three lots of 10 animals were fed the same ration except for the added enzymes. The average daily ration is shown in Table 25, as are results of the test for the first 112 days. There are no significant differences in gains at present; however, lot 12, which receives a combination of enzymes that act upon carbohydrates and protein, has a slightly higher rate of gain. Animals in lot 12 also have a tendency to clean up their feed better than those in either other lot. This test will be continued until the animals are ready for slaughter.
  • ItemOpen Access
    A comparison of feeding hay to heifers on bluestem pasture and in drylot
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Good, D.L.; Koch, B.A.; Boren, Fred W.
    This study was designed to evaluate mature dry winter pasture for animals fed all of the harvested roughage such as hay that they would consume. In addition one group animals wintered in drylot were moved to pasture one month prior to the start of the summer growing season to study their adjustment to pasture.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Rolled vs. finely ground pelleted sorghum rain in cattle rations
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W.
    This is a progress report of another test to further evaluate methods of sorghum grain preparation. Twenty of the heaviest steer calves purchased for experimental work were divided into two lots of 10 animals each. The daily ration is shown in Table 27. The only difference in the ration is that lot 3 received rolled sorghum grain and lot 4 finely ground pelleted sorghum grain. The gains and feed efficiency up to this time are essentially the same. The feed cost per 100 pounds gain is exactly the same. After completing the wintering phase, these animals will receive a fattening ration.
  • ItemOpen Access
    A comparison of dry rolled and steam rolled sorghum grain
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Richardson, D.; Koch, B.A.; Boren, Fred W.
    Good to choice quality yearling Hereford heifers originating near Fort Davis, Texas, were used in the trial. They had been on bluestem pasture prior to the test and were allotted to treatments on the basis of prior treatment and weight. The two lots were fed in an identical manner except one lot received dry rolled sorghum grain (resembling cracked grain, as rollers were set to crack rather than roll the grain) and the other lot received steam rolled grain. Some difficulty was encountered in removing sufficient moisture from the steam rolled grain after rolling to prevent it from heating.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Response of previously implanted cattle to oral diethylstilbestrol
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Koch, B.A.; Smith, E.F.; Richardson, D.; Cox, R.F.
    May 4, 1959 steers on the trace mineral study in Woodson County were randomly divided. A 12-mg. implant of diethylstilbestrol was placed in the left ear of each of six calves in either treatment group. All calves grazed on native pasture until August 1, 1959. They were then weighed off pasture and trucked to Manhattan. After a one-week adjustment period they were started on full feed. The fattening period lasted 90 days; during that time all steers received 10 mgs. of oral diethylstilbestrol per head per day.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Rolled vs. finely ground pelleted sorghum grain in cattle rations
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W.
    Twenty Hereford steer calves were divided as equally as possible on the basis of weight and conformation into two lots of 10 animals each. The average daily rations are shown in Table 22 for the wintering and fattening phases. The ingredients were the same in both lots except rolled grain was used in lot 1 and finely ground pelleted grain in lot 2. The concentrate part of the ration was kept constant, with all the roughage the animals would clean up.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The value of Diethylstilbestrol implants and implants plus an Antibiotic for wintering steer calves
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Richardson, D.; Boren, Fred W.
    Forty-four good-to-choice Hereford steer calves from near Fort Davis, Texas, were randomly allotted according to weight to three treatments. All lots were fed the same high roughage rations. They received per head daily: 5 pounds of sorghum grain and 1 pound of soybean meal. Sorghum silage was fed according to appetite, and salt was offered free choice.
  • ItemUnknown
    Concentrate-roughage ratios in pelleted rations for fattening lambs. Three mgs. Stilbestrol implants and/or cobalt bullets for lambs fed pelleted rations
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Menzies, C.S.; Richardson, D.; Cox, R.F.
    One hundred fifty-white faced New Mexico wether lambs were used. Lambs were shorn and drenched with phenothiazine before starting on test. Two weeks after the lambs arrived from the range an outbreak of coccidiosis occurred. Approximately half of the lambs were treated with sulfa-drugs. November 30, about five weeks after lambs arrived from range, they were weighed, divided into six lots of 22 lambs each, and self fed.
  • ItemUnknown
    Stilbestrol implants for steer calves on a wintering, grazing, and fattening program; the value of Aureomycin during the wintering and fattening periods
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Carmack, B.D.; Boren, Fred W.
    The Hereford steer calves used in this experiment were assigned to experimental lots randomly according to weight. They originated near Paducah, Texas, and graded USDA Good as feeders. All received the same basic ration from December 1, 1958, to April 28, 1959. They were grazed on bluestem pasture from April 28, 1959, to July 24, 1959, and were self-fed grain on grass from July 24 to November 14, 1959.
  • ItemUnknown
    A comparison of wintering in drylot with wintering on bluestem pasture for yearling steers on a wintering, grazing, and fattening program
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Boren, Fred W.
    Twenty head of yearling Hereford steers, grading about high good on the basis of USDA feeder grades, were used in the test. They came from near Fort Davis and Paducab, Texas, and were allotted into tow lots on the basis of origin and weight. They were in the heavy end of the calves purchased in the fall of 1958 and were about one year old when started on the test. The only difference in treatment of the two lots was during the winter period.
  • ItemUnknown
    The effects of shade and hormone implant on fattening yearling heifers
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Richardson, D.; Wearden, S.; Boren, Fred W.
    Fifty head of Hereford heifers averaging 607 pounds per head were used in the 1959. They were placed in five lots, 10 head per lot on the basis of live weight and previous treatment. The heifers were on test from May 14, 1959, to October 1, 1959 (140 days). At the beginning of the experiment the heifers were consuming 5 pounds of sorghum grain, 1 pound of soybean meal, and 5 pounds of alfalfa per head daily. They were rapidly brought to a daily ration composed of all the sorghum grain they would consume, 1 pound of soybean meal, and 5 pounds of alfalfa hay. At the termination of the test, the heifers were sold on the central market at St. Joseph, Mo.
  • ItemUnknown
    The value of supplementary trace minerals in a fattening ration
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Carmack, B.D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Boren, Fred W.
    Forty head of good-to-choice Hereford yearling heifers were divided into four lots, 10 in each lot, on the basis of weight and previous treatment. The heifers were purchased near Fort Davis, Texas, as calves the fall of 1958. They were wintered and summer grazed on bluestem pastures near Manhattan before the experiment.
  • ItemUnknown
    The value of grain sorghum harvested as silage and as dehydrated pellets
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Richardson, D.; Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Tsien, W.S.; Boren, Fred W.
    Combine-type sorghum grain is widely grown in Kansas, and normally only the grain is harvested. In many instances, moisture conditions at harvest time are such that the grain cannot be stored without artificial drying. Sometimes there is danger of losing immature grain because of early frost. This test was planned to study the value of the entire grain sorghum plant harvested as silage and as dehydrated pellets.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Adapting roughages varying in quality and curing processes to the nutrition of beef cattle. Pelleted alfalfa hay and dehydrated pelleted green forage-type sorghum in the winter ration of heifer calves
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-10-03) Smith, E.F.; Koch, B.A.; Richardson, D.; Cox, R.F.; Boren, Fred W.
    This is the second year of an experiment designed to compare the feeding value of alfalfa fed as long hay or coarsely-ground hay pellets, and forage-type sorghum fed as silage or dehydrated green forage sorghum pellets. Fifty head of choice-quality heifer calves from the Jeff Ranch, Fort Davis, Texas, were used in this experiment. They were allotted, 10 head per lot, on the basis of live weight, and fed a winter ration.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The value of Terramycin (TM-10) and Oleandomycin in the protein supplement for fattening spring pigs on alfalfa pasture
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-09-20) Aubel, C.E.
    The antibiotic, Oleandomycin, is a recent introduction. This experiment was to test the antibiotics value. Three lots of nine pigs each were self-fed shelled corn and a mixed protein supplement on alfalfa pasture. All three lots had the same mixed protein supplement of 4 parts tankage, 4 parts soybean meal, 1 part cottonseed meal, and 1 part alfalfa meal. 4 ½ pounds of Terramycin TM-10 and 4 ½ pounds of Oleandomycin were added per ton to the protein mixture of lot 2. Lot 3 pigs had 4 ½ pounds of Oleandomycin premix added per ton to their protein mixture.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The value of yeast culture and L-Lysine (amino acid) in a sorghum grain ration for finishing fall pigs in drylot
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-09-20) Aubel, C.E.
    Sorghum grain is deficient in the amino acid, lysine. This test was to determine the value of a lysine feeding supplement recently on the market. Cultured yeast also is a source of lysine. Three lots of 10 pigs were fed, free choice, whole sorghum grain with a mixed protein supplement. One lot received the whole sorghum grain and a mixed protein supplement of 4 parts tankage, 4 parts soybean meal, 1 part cottonseed meal, and 1 part alfalfa meal. To each ton of the supplement 27 pounds Aurofac and one half pound zinc oxide were added. A second lot was fed the same except that 100 pounds of yeast culture was added to each 500 pounds of protein mix. A third lot was fed as lot 1 except that 10 pounds L-lysine feeding supplement was added to each ton of supplement.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Cobolt "bullets" for beef cattle
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-09-20) Koch, B.A.; Smith, E.F.; Richardson, D.; Cox, R.F.
    Earlier work at this station indicated that supplemental trace minerals may be of value in some instances. Introduction of the so-called cobalt “bullet” has made it possible to study one of these trace minerals alone as a dietary supplement.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The value of soaking whole sorghum grain for finishing pigs in drylot
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-09-20) Aubel, C.E.
    Two lots of pigs were self-fed, free choice, whole sorghum grain and a mixed protein supplement. Each lot contained 10 pigs. In one lot, the whole sorghum grain was fed dry; in the other, it was automatically fed into the water warmed enough to prevent freezing.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The comparative value of shelled corn and sorghum grain prepared by different milling processes for finishing fall pigs drylot
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-09-20) Aubel, C.E.
    Grain sorghums are being grown extensively in many parts of the High Plains. Sorghum grain previously has given excellent results compared with corn in feeding tests with swine at this station. New ways of processing grain may improve the efficiency of the grains for feeding and thus provide more profit in hog raising. Five lots of pigs were self-fed, free choice, in drylot. All lots received a mixed animal and plant protein supplement of 4 parts tankage, 4 parts soybean meal, 1 part cottonseed meal, and 1 part alfalfa meal. Each ton of mixed protein supplement also contained 27 pounds of Aurofac and one half pound of zinc oxide. The ration for each lot varied only in the method of processing.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Trifluomeprazine fed to fattening steers
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2011-09-20) Koch, B.A.; Smith, E.F.; Richardson, D.; McCarter, M.M.
    The steers used in this study were good to choice grade Herefords, averaging 980 pounds, that originated in New Mexico. They had been wintered in central Kansas at a rather high level of feeding. The steers were randomly allotted, according to weight, into four groups of 10 animals each.