Establishing boundary lines in the United States

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dc.contributor.author Esdon, Harriet Marie
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-20T21:54:11Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-20T21:54:11Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/37851
dc.description Citation: Esdon, Harriet Marie. Establishing boundary lines in the United States. Senior thesis, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906.
dc.description.abstract Introduction: In the Provisional Treaty made with Great Britain Nov. 30, 1782, the limits of the United States were first definitely laid down. Article 2 of this Treaty defines the boundary between the United States and the British possessions the same as the definite Treaty of Sept. 3, 1783, which is as follows: "And that all disputes which might arise in future, on the subject of the boundaries of the said United States may be prevented, it is hereby agreed and declared, that the following are, and shall be their boundaries, viz.: From the north west angle of Nova Scotia, viz. that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north from said Highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River; thence down along the middle of that river, to the forty-fifth degree of north latitude; from thence by a line due west on said latitude, until it strikes the river Iroquois or Cataraquy; thence along the middle of said river into Lake Ontario, through the middle of said lake until it strikes the communication by water between that lake and Lake Erie; thence along the middle of said communication into Lake Erie, through the middle of said lake until it arrives at the water communication between that lake and Lake Huron; thence along the middle of said water communication into the Lake Huron; thence through the middle of said lake to the water communication between that lake and Lake Superior; thence through Lake Superior northward of the Isles Royal and Phelepeaux, to the Long Lake; thence through the middle of said Long Lake, and the water communication between it and the Lake of the Woods, to the said Lake of the Woods; thence through the said lake to the most northwestern point thereof, and from thence on a due west course to the river Mississippi; thence by a line to be drawn along the middle of the said river Mississippi until it shall intersect the northernmost part of the thirty-first degree of north latitude.
dc.rights Public Domain Mark 1.0
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/
dc.subject Boundary Lines
dc.subject United States
dc.subject Geography
dc.subject International Boundary
dc.title Establishing boundary lines in the United States
dc.type Text
dc.date.published 1906
dc.subject.AAT Theses


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