Dietary lysine requirements of segregated early-weaned pigs

K-REx Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Owen, K.Q.
dc.contributor.author Richert, B.T.
dc.contributor.author Friesen, K.G.
dc.contributor.author Smith, J.W. II
dc.contributor.author Bergstrom, J.R.
dc.contributor.author Nelssen, Jim L.
dc.contributor.author Goodband, Robert D.
dc.contributor.author Tokach, Michael D.
dc.contributor.author Dritz, Steven S.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-26T19:21:05Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-26T19:21:05Z
dc.date.issued 2010-03-26T19:21:05Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/3374
dc.description.abstract A total of 320 (160 barrows and 160 gilts) 14- to 18-d-old pigs (initially 10.2 ± 2.2 lb) was used to determine the optimal level of dietary lysine needed for the segregated early-weaned pig. Two diet formulation methods were used with six dietary lysine levels within each formulation method, resulting in a 2 X 6 factorial arrangement of treatments. The first formulation method consisted of a basal diet that contained 1.95% lysine. Increasing levels of cornstarch replaced L-lysine to achieve the other five dietary treatments (1.2, 1.35, 1.50, 1.65, and 1.80% dietary lysine). All other amino acids in each diet were maintained at the same level as in the 1.95% lysine treatment. The second formulation method consisted of a basal diet (1.2% lysine) with the live additional treatments achieved by adding synthetic lysine and other essential amino acids to maintain an ideal amino acid ratio, relative to lysine. All diets contained 20% dried whey, 10% lactose, 7.5% spray-dried porcine plasma, 5.0% spray-dried wheat gluten, 5.0% select menhaden fish meal, 5.0% soybean oil, and 1.75% spray-dried blood meal. No lysine x formulation method interactions occurred for average daily gain (ADG) or average daily feed intake (ADFI) throughout the 28 d period. However, lysine x formulation method interactions were observed for feed efficiency (F/G) from d 0 to 7, d 0 to 14, and d 0 to 28. From d 0 to 7 postweaning, ADG was improved quadratically as dietary lysine increased and appeared to be maximized at 1.65% dietary lysine. Feed efficiency was lowest for pigs fed 1.80% lysine for the first diet formulation method and for pigs fed 1.95% lysine for the second diet formulation method. From d 0 to 14 postweaning, ADG and F/G were improved by increasing dietary lysine, with both response criteria maximized in pigs fed approximately 1.65% dietary lysine. However, ADFI was not affected during the 28-d experiment. These data suggest that segregated early-weaned pigs require approximately 5.2 and 6.2 g/d of lysine from d 0 to 7 and d 0 to 14 postweaning, respectively, to optimize growth performance. Based on these results, the diet for pigs < 11 lb needs to be formulated to contain at least 1.7% lysine. The transition diet (11 to 15 lb) should be formulated to contain approximately 1.5 to 1.6% lysine. en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Swine day, 1994 en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station contribution; no. 95-175-S en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Report of progress (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service); 717 en_US
dc.subject Swine en_US
dc.subject Pigs en_US
dc.subject Requirements en_US
dc.subject Segregated early weaning en_US
dc.title Dietary lysine requirements of segregated early-weaned pigs en_US
dc.type Conference paper en_US
dc.date.published 1994 en_US
dc.citation.epage 41 en_US
dc.citation.spage 37 en_US
dc.description.conference Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 17, 1994 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jnelssen en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid goodband en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid mtokach en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jbergstr en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid dritz en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search K-REx


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics








Center for the

Advancement of Digital

Scholarship

cads@k-state.edu