Dedicated bioenergy crop impacts on soil wind erodibility and organic carbon in Kansas

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dc.contributor.author Evers, Byron J.
dc.contributor.author Blanco-Canqui, Humberto
dc.contributor.author Staggenborg, Scott A.
dc.contributor.author Tatarko, John
dc.date.accessioned 2013-11-26T14:30:11Z
dc.date.available 2013-11-26T14:30:11Z
dc.date.issued 2013-11-26
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16931
dc.description Citation: Evers, Byron J., Humberto Blanco‐Canqui, Scott A. Staggenborg, and John Tatarko. “Dedicated Bioenergy Crop Impacts on Soil Wind Erodibility and Organic Carbon in Kansas.” Agronomy Journal 105, no. 5 (2013): 1271–76. https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj2013.0072.
dc.description.abstract Dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial warm-season grasses (WSGs) may reduce soil erosion and improve soil properties while providing biomass feedstock for biofuel. We quantified impacts of perennial WSGs and row crops on soil wind erodibility parameters (erodible fraction, geometric mean diameter of dry aggregates, and aggregate stability) and soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration under a dedicated bioenergy crop experiment in eastern Kansas after 4 and 5 yr of management. Soil properties were measured under switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii L.), miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus), and annual row crops including continuous corn (Zea mays L.), photoperiod sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.], sweet sorghum, and grain sorghum. Perennial WSGs reduced wind erodible fraction by 1.08 to 1.16 times compared with row crops. The geometric mean diameter of dry aggregates under switchgrass and miscanthus was 2.8 to 4.5 times greater than under row crops. Dry soil aggregate stability under miscanthus and big bluestem was greater than under row crops. After 5 yr, differences in SOC concentration between WSGs and row crops were not statistically significant for the 0- to 15-cm depth. Photoperiod sensitive and sweet sorghum had greater biomass yield than WSGs. In 2011, miscanthus yielded more biomass than corn by 5.3 Mg haˉ¹. Overall, growing dedicated bioenergy crops can reduce the soil’s susceptibility to wind erosion but may not significantly increase SOC concentration in this region in the short term. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj2013.0072 en_US
dc.rights Permission to archive granted by the American Society of Agronomy, September 13, 2013. Copyright © 2013 by the American Society of Agronomy, 5585 Guilford Road, Madison, WI 53711. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. en_US
dc.rights.uri https://acsess.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/usage-permissions
dc.subject Bioenergy crops en_US
dc.subject Soil erosion en_US
dc.subject Perennial warm-season grasses en_US
dc.subject Wind erodibility en_US
dc.title Dedicated bioenergy crop impacts on soil wind erodibility and organic carbon in Kansas en_US
dc.type Article (author version) en_US
dc.date.published 2013 en_US
dc.citation.doi 10.2134/agronj2013.0072 en_US
dc.citation.epage 1276 en_US
dc.citation.issn 0002-1962
dc.citation.issue 5 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Agronomy Journal en_US
dc.citation.spage 1271 en_US
dc.citation.volume 105 en_US
dc.citation Evers, Byron J., Humberto Blanco‐Canqui, Scott A. Staggenborg, and John Tatarko. “Dedicated Bioenergy Crop Impacts on Soil Wind Erodibility and Organic Carbon in Kansas.” Agronomy Journal 105, no. 5 (2013): 1271–76. https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj2013.0072.
dc.contributor.authoreid sstaggen en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid tatarko en_US


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