A diploid wheat TILLING resource for wheat functional genomics

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dc.contributor.author Rawat, Nidhi
dc.contributor.author Sehgal, Sunish K.
dc.contributor.author Joshi, Anupama
dc.contributor.author Rothe, Nolan
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Duane L.
dc.contributor.author McGraw, Nathan
dc.contributor.author Vadlani, Praveen V.
dc.contributor.author Li, Wanlong
dc.contributor.author Gill, Bikram S.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-20T15:21:56Z
dc.date.available 2013-03-20T15:21:56Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-07
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/15383
dc.description Citation: Rawat, N., . . . & Gill, B. (2012). A diploid wheat TILLING resource for wheat functional genomics. BMC Plant Biology, 12(1), 205. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-12-205
dc.description.abstract Background: Triticum monococcum L., an A genome diploid einkorn wheat, was the first domesticated crop. As a diploid, it is attractive genetic model for the study of gene structure and function of wheat-specific traits. Diploid wheat is currently not amenable to reverse genetics approaches such as insertion mutagenesis and post-transcriptional gene silencing strategies. However, TILLING offers a powerful functional genetics approach for wheat gene analysis. Results: We developed a TILLING population of 1,532 M[subscript 2] families using EMS as a mutagen. A total of 67 mutants were obtained for the four genes studied. Waxy gene mutation frequencies are known to be 1/17.6 - 34.4 kb DNA in polyploid wheat TILLING populations. The T. monococcum diploid wheat TILLING population had a mutation frequency of 1/90 kb for the same gene. Lignin biosynthesis pathway genes- COMT1, HCT2, and 4CL1 had mutation frequencies of 1/86 kb, 1/92 kb and 1/100 kb, respectively. The overall mutation frequency of the diploid wheat TILLING population was 1/92 kb. Conclusion: The mutation frequency of a diploid wheat TILLING population was found to be higher than that reported for other diploid grasses. The rate, however, is lower than tetraploid and hexaploid wheat TILLING populations because of the higher tolerance of polyploids to mutations. Unlike polyploid wheat, most mutants in diploid wheat have a phenotype amenable to forward and reverse genetic analysis and establish diploid wheat as an attractive model to study gene function in wheat. We estimate that a TILLING population of 5, 520 will be needed to get a non-sense mutation for every wheat gene of interest with 95% probability. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-12-205 en_US
dc.rights © 2012 Rawat et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.subject TILLING en_US
dc.subject Reverse genetics en_US
dc.subject Triticum monococcum en_US
dc.subject Mutation frequency en_US
dc.subject Waxy en_US
dc.subject Lignin en_US
dc.title A diploid wheat TILLING resource for wheat functional genomics en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.date.published 2012 en_US
dc.citation.doi 10.1186/1471-2229-12-205 en_US
dc.citation.issn 1471-2229
dc.citation.jtitle BMC Plant Biology en_US
dc.citation.spage 205 en_US
dc.citation.volume 12 en_US
dc.citation Rawat, N., . . . & Gill, B. (2012). A diploid wheat TILLING resource for wheat functional genomics. BMC Plant Biology, 12(1), 205. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-12-205
dc.contributor.authoreid nidhirwt en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid sksehgal en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid nrothe en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid dlwil en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid vadlani en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid bsgill en_US
dc.description.version Article: Version of Record


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© 2012 Rawat et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, the use of this item is bound by the following: © 2012 Rawat et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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