Physical activity and physical function in older adults: the 45 and up study

K-REx Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Yorston, Lisa C.
dc.contributor.author Kolt, Gregory S.
dc.contributor.author Rosenkranz, Richard R.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-16T14:30:31Z
dc.date.available 2013-01-16T14:30:31Z
dc.date.issued 2013-01-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/15208
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVES: To determine the strength of the relationship between physical activity and physical function in older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: The 45 and Up Study baseline questionnaire, New South Wales, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-one thousand three hundred seventy-five Australian men and women aged 65 and older from the 45 and Up Study. MEASUREMENTS: Physical activity engagement (Active Australia Survey), physical function (Medical Outcomes Study Physical Functioning), psychological distress (Kessler- 10), and self-reported age, smoking history, education, height, and weight were all measured. RESULTS: Higher levels of physical activity were associated with better physical function in older adults (correlation coefficient = 0.166, P < .001). Participants engaging in higher levels of physical activity had progressively lower likelihoods of functional limitation (middle tertile: odds ratio (OR) = 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38– 0.41; highest tertile: OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.27–0.29). This relationship remained significant, but weakened slightly, when adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking history, psychological distress, and educational attainment (middle tertile: adjusted OR (AOR) = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.46–0.50; highest tertile: AOR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.34–0.37). CONCLUSION: There is a significant, positive relationship between physical activity and physical function in older adults, with older adults who are more physically active being less likely to experience functional limitation than their more-sedentary counterparts. Level of engagement in physical activity is an important predictor of physical function in older adults. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.03906.x/abstract en_US
dc.rights Archived with acknowledgement of the American Geriatrics Society and Blackwell Publishing. The definitive version is available at www.wiley-synergy.com en_US
dc.subject Older adults en_US
dc.subject Psychological distress en_US
dc.subject Sedentary lifestyle en_US
dc.subject Activities of daily living en_US
dc.subject Aging en_US
dc.title Physical activity and physical function in older adults: the 45 and up study en_US
dc.type Article (author version) en_US
dc.date.published 2012 en_US
dc.citation.doi doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.03906.x en_US
dc.citation.epage 725 en_US
dc.citation.issue 4 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Journal of the American Geriatrics Society en_US
dc.citation.spage 719 en_US
dc.citation.volume 60 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid ricardo en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search K-REx


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics








Center for the

Advancement of Digital

Scholarship

118 Hale Library

Manhattan KS 66506


(785) 532-7444

cads@k-state.edu