Swine Day, 1969

Permanent URI for this collection

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 9 of 9
  • ItemOpen Access
    Effect of oxytocin on parturition in sows
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:47:55Z) Kiracofe, G.H.; Hines, Robert H.
    The hormone oxytocin (a hypothalamic neurosecretion that is stored in the posterior pituitary gland) stimulates' uterine contractions during natural parturition. Commerical oxytocin has been used to induce labor or to intensify uterine contractions during difficult or prolonged labor in sows. This test evaluated use of one level of a commercial oxytocin during normal parturition.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Carcass evaluation procedures compared
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:46:00Z) Kropf, Donald H.; Bergkamp, J.L.; Berroth, J.N.
    This study compared various methods of evaluating carcasses. Data from 57 barrows on feeding trials for a barrow contest at the 1968 Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson were used.The barrows went on test weighing approximately 50 pounds each and were taken off feed individually at 200- 220 pounds, held off feed over night and slaughtered at the Kansas State University Meats Laboratory. Live weight was determined immediately before slaughter and carcass weight, after a 24-hour chill. Cutting time ranged from 24 to 120 hours post-mortem.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Simple and complex pig starters compared
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:45:48Z) Koch, B.A.; Hines, Robert H.
    Baby pigs have the ability to grow rapidly and efficiently. Creep rations at an early age enhance their potential. Most commercial creep rations contain feedstuffs to increase palatability and acceptability. Are these ingredients necessary or will rather simple starters produce similar gains? Five starters were compared, varying from a simple corn-milo- soybean meal ration to a ration containing several palatability aiding ingredients--from 10 days of age to weaning at 28-35 days; and from 6 weeks to 10 weeks of age.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Methods of preventing baby pig anemia compared
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:45:38Z) Koch, B.A.; Hines, Robert H.
    Anemia as it most frequently occurs in baby pigs usually is caused by an iron deficiency. Iron stored in a baby pig is extremely limited and is quickly used to produce hemoglobin to maintain oxygen-carrying capacity in the blood. Supplemental iron is needed almost immediately since the quantity of iron received from sow's milk is extremely small.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Low-level antibiotics in growing-finishing swine rations.
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:45:28Z) Koch, B.A.; Hines, Robert H.
    The new K-State facilities for growing-finishing swine seemed ideal to re-evaluate various antibiotics as low-level feed additives. The first trial reported here was with the first pigs fed in the new barn. They also were the first farrowed in the new farrowing house, and the first raised in the new nursery. The trials were designed to: (1) compare rations with and without an antibiotic at a low level, (2) various antibiotics and combinations of antibiotics and (3) to determine the need for extra feeder space.
  • ItemOpen Access
    DDVP (Shell Dichlorvos) for weanling pigs
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:45:16Z) Koch, B.A.; Hines, Robert H.
    Recent reports indicate that a low level (25 parts per million of active ingredient) of 2,2 dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (DDVP) increases growth of weanling pigs. The trial reported here was designed to measure such response in pigs from Dichlorvos-fed sows and also in pigs from sows not receiving Dichlorvos during late pregnancy.
  • ItemOpen Access
    DDVP (Shell Dichlorvos) for pregnant sows
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:43:51Z) Koch, B.A.; Hines, Robert H.
    Most recent laboratory and research station reports have indicated that 2,2 - dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (DDVP) (Shell Dichlorvos) fed at low levels to pregnant sows in late gestation favorably affects newborn pigs. A field study we reported last year showed no favorable effect among over 200 litters. More than 600 barrows were checked at slaughter and no difference was detected in slaughter age between pigs from treated or untreated sows. Trials reported here involve sows and gilts in the K-State research swine herd. Trial 1 was those farrowing in March; trial 2, those farrowing in May.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Ten-year summary of K.S.I.A. swine testing station data
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:35:22Z) Hines, Robert H.
    Swine testing stations "performance prove” breeding lines for genetic progress in the swine industry. The phenotype of a boar is a combination of his genetic ability and environment (nutrition, health, and etc.). Thus by using central test stations where all pigs are housed in similar pens and fed the same rations, the effect of environment is reduced so the genetic ability is more accurately appraised. The Kansas Swine Testing Station first tested hogs for Kansas Breeders the fall of 1958. Since then about 100 breeders have participated in the test station.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Lysine supplementation for growing-finishing swine rations
    (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2010-05-07T21:35:08Z) Koch, B.A.; Hines, Robert H.
    The protein level and protein quality of swine rations consisting primarily of grain can be changed by adding either protein like soybean meal or individual amino acids like lysine. Protein requirements are based on individual amino acids that compose the protein. Amino acid most lacking in grain proteins is lysine, so lysine is the most limiting amino acid in growing-finishing rations made up primarily of grain. Feeding trials reported here were designed to: (1) compare corn and sorghum grain, (2) determine the value of 0.1% of lysine added to the ration, (3) compare performance of barrows and gilts and (4) determine feeder space needed.