Livestock Feeders' Day, 1951

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  • ItemOpen Access
    Comparison of different methods of managing bluestem pasture.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-02-16) Smith, E.F.; Anderson, K.
    In the present serious the first test to compare different methods of grazing bluestem pasture was conducted in 1949 and was reported in Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Circular 265. This report is concerned with the second test conducted in 1950. The objective of this experiment is to find out what the carrying capacity of bluestem pasture is, how deferred and rotation grazing compare with season long grazing, and if bluestem pasture should be burned or not.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The value of sorghum distillers dried solubles in protein feed mixtures when fed as a supplement to shelled corn for fattening spring pigs on alfalfa pasture.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Aubel, C.E.
    In recent years much attention has been given to the feeding of distillers by-products to livestock. One of these distillers dried soluble derived from the malting of various grains. In addition to other nutrients, it furnishes some of the B vitamins that have lately been show to be important in swine feeding.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Rolled vs. ground grain for fattening yearling heifers.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Cox, R.F.; Smith, E.F.
    A great deal of interest in rolled grain has been expressed. Some commercial feeders have purchased rollers in preference to grinders; a few feeders truck grain to town to have it rolled in preference to grinding grain at home. The usual recommendation for grain preparation for fattening commercial cattle has been to have it cracked or medium ground, not finely ground. Rolled grain has been considered by most people to be equal to medium ground or cracked grain and by some to be superior to medium ground or cracked grain. No conclusive experimental evidence was available as to the best method of grain preparation for fattening cattle. The objective of this study then is to find out which is the best method of grain preparation: rolling, coarse grinding or fine grinding.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Improvement of beef cattle through breeding methods.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, W.H.; Smith, E.F.; Ibsen, H.L.
    A National Beef Cattle Breeding Research Program has been initiated and is organized in three areas which are referred to as the Western, Southern, and North Central Regions in the United States. The Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station is co-operating with 12 other states in the North Central Region. The purebred Shorthorn herd maintained at Manhattan is being used as the primary basis for the purebred cattle breeding investigations conducted by the Kansas Station.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Preliminary report on the effects of withholding salt and the effects of high and low potassium-sodium ratios upon the feedlot performance of lambs.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Hix, E.L.; Bell, T.D.; Good, A.L.; Parrish, D.B.
    Many of the feed lambs coming into Kansas have not had access to salt for several weeks and some of the lamb feeders do not add salt to their lambs fattening rations because of the possible losses in getting the lambs again accustomed to eating salt. The experimental studies, initiated this year, should indicated whether such a practice results in poorer feedlot performance. The studies should also lead to a clearer understanding of the physiological function of salt in the sheep’s diet.
  • ItemUnknown
    Performance of steers sired by bulls of different sizes. A comparison of Hereford steers sired by small, medium, and large size bulls.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Weber, A.D.; Mackintosh, D.L.; Good, D.L.; Smith, E.F.
    The Kansas, Oklahoma, and Ohio Agricultural Experiment Stations co-operated in this study, which was supported by grants from the American Hereford Association. The project involved comparisons of steer calves sired by small, medium, and large size bulls. Each sire group at each station was handled under the following systems of feeding and management: System I-immediate full feeding for 225 days. System II-a deferred full-feeding program in which the steer calves are wintered well, grazing without grain from May 1 to August 1, and then full-fed in dry lot 100 days. System III-the production of two-year-old grass-fat steers without the feeding of grain. Phases under this system include: wintering as calves without grain; grazing as yearlings a full season without supplemental feed; wintering as yearlings without grain; grazing as two-year-olds without supplemental feed and selling as slaughter cattle directly off pasture.
  • ItemUnknown
    Methods of wintering steer calves that are to be grazed a full season and sold off of grass, 1950-51.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Good, D.L.; Cox, R.F.
    This is a report on the wintering phase of this test. It will be completed at the close of the grazing season in 1951. The purpose of this study is to determine the best method of wintering good quality steer calves that are to be grazed on bluestem pastures the following summer and sold off grass.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The use of brome grass in fattening yearling heifers as compared to fattening in a dry lot.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Cox, R.F.; Good, D.L.; Mackintosh, D.L.
    The purpose of this study is to develop a system of fattening heifers for feeders who do not have native pasture or have no pasture. The plan of production is to buy good quality heifer calves in the fall, winter them well (which entails the feeding of about two pounds of grain per head daily in addition to roughage and protein). Following the winter period there are three alternatives being tested: full feed in dry lot; full feed on brome grass pasture; graze brome pasture early, then full feed in dry lot.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Fattening heifers for the fall market.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Good, D.L.; Cox, R.F.; Mackintosh, D.L.
    The purpose of this experiment is to develop a desirable system of fattening heifer calves similar to the deferred full-feeding system for steer calves. The system developed for good quality steer calves consists of three phases: (1) producing 225-250 pounds of gain during the winter, which usually requires the feeding of four to five pounds of grain per head daily; (2) grazing 90 days without grain; (3) full-feeding 100 days in the dry lot.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The relationship of physical balance and energy value in sheep rations studies carried out at the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Manhattan, Kansas.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Bell, T.D.; Cox, R.F.; Hughes, J.S.
    Lamb fattening rations varying in physical nature buy virtually alike chemically have been studied at the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station for a number of years. Previous tests have demonstrated that the rate of gains and the efficiency of feed utilization by fattening lambs are associated closely with the physical balance or the concentration and bulkiness of the ration. The results of the experiments conducted during the summer of 1950 as well as preliminary results of the 1951 trails are reported.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Methods of wintering steer calves that are to be grazed a full season and sold off of grass.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Good, D.L.; Cox, R.F.
    It is a well known fact that thin steers usually gain more on grass than fleshy steers. However, little information is available about the total gain, winter and summer, of steers wintered in different ways and then grazed on bluestem pasture. The primary objective of this test is to determine how steer calves that are to be grazed a full season on bluestem pasture and sold off grass should be wintered. This is the first years work on a three-year project.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The effect of withholding salt on the growth and condition of steers.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Parrish, D.B.; Clawson, A.J.
    Then good quality Hereford steer calves were used in this study. They were divided into two equal lots. Both lots were treated similarly except salt was withheld from one lot. The calves were started on the test December 14, 1949, wintered, used in a spring digestion trial, full-fed in dry lot and marketed on November 2, 1950.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Wintering yearling steers on dry bluestem pasture
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Cox, R.F.
    The primary purpose of this test is to determine if yearling steers can be satisfactorily wintered on dry bluestem pasture. Different protein supplements as well as methods of feeding them on dry bluestem pasture are being tested.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Effect of feeding a protein supplement during the latter part of the grazing season to two-year-old steers on bluestem pasture.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Cox, R.F.
    The nutritive value of bluestem pasture usually beings to decline rapidly after mid-summer. This test is concerned with what effect the feeding of a protein supplement after mid-summer will have on cattle gains and conditions. It is hoped that by starting the feeding at different times the most opportune time to start feeding may be determined.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Methods of wintering yearling steers on bluestem pasture.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Cox, R.F.
    The primary purpose of this study is to test the value of dry bluestem pasture as a winter feed for yearling steers fed different kinds and amounts of protein supplements.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Wintering heifer calves that are to be fattened for the summer or early fall market.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Smith, E.F.; Good, D.L.; Cox, R.F.
    This is a report of the wintering phase of this test. Following this phase the different lots will either be full-fed or go to grass and be full-fed after the grazing period. The objective of the test is to develop a method of fattening heifers similar to the deferred full-feeding system for steer calves. The 1950-51 wintering test included: (1) a comparison of grain and no grain in the wintering ration of heifer calves; (2) a comparison of expeller type soybean oil meal pellets and hydraulic extracted cottonseed oil meal pellets.
  • ItemOpen Access
    A comparison of rolled, coarse and fine ground milo grain for fattening steer calves.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-25) Cox, R.F.; Smith, E.F.
    This is a progress report on full feeding rolled, coarse ground, and fine ground milo grain to steer calves. The test will be completed in July, 1951 when the steers will have been on full feed about 225 days. The objective of the test is to determine which is the most profitable method of preparing milo grain for full feeding, rolling, coarse grinding, or fine grinding.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Wheat pasture and feedlot fattening tests with lambs.
    (Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, 2012-01-19) Bell, T.D.; Erhart, A.B.
    This year’s experiments included first, a series of wheat pasture tests, and later, various feedlot fattening tests. In the five lots of lambs on wheat pasture the effect of withholding salt, the value of additional roughage, and the efficiency of sods as well as vaccination in the control of over-eating disease, were studied. A check lot was fed a standard western Kansas feedlot ration.