The effects of combat related stress on learning in an academic environment

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dc.contributor.author Shea, Kevin Peter
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-29T20:44:32Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-29T20:44:32Z
dc.date.issued 2010-11-29
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/6683
dc.description.abstract This qualitative case study described the incidence of stress in the lives of Army officers, and its effect on their learning experiences at the Army‘s Command and General Staff College (CGSC). It described the experiences of officers who have completed multiple combat deployments and coped with the effects of combat related stress in an academic environment. The study further illuminated a number of issues surrounding combat related stress and learning, and framed them using the words of the eleven United States Army Command and General Staff College student participants. This qualitative case study combined the interviews of the eleven students with other members of the Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Army community to include an Army psychiatrist, a Department of Army civilian psychologist, a CGSC faculty focus group, and an Army chaplain. All of the Army officers in the study are combat veterans with an average of over 23 months of combat. This case study confirmed that being in an academic environment increased the stress levels of even combat veterans. This research further confirmed levels of anger, alcohol usage, and sleeplessness among CGSC students and its effect on their learning. It identified the impact of transitions, dual enrollment, and social functioning in family settings, as well as confirming that there is still a continued stigma associated with Soldiers seeking assistance for mental health. The stigma is exacerbated by inaccurate reporting and a culture that reflects a lack of support within certain levels of the service. This study contributes to the current body of knowledge and provides additional information and insights on the effects of combat related stress on learning. Finally, this study is relevant, germane, and timely given the number of Soldiers who have been repeatedly exposed to combat operations. This exposure to combat exponentially increases the incidence of combat related stress in their lives. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University en
dc.subject Learning en_US
dc.subject Soldiers en_US
dc.subject Combat related stress en_US
dc.subject Transitions en_US
dc.subject adult education en_US
dc.subject academic stress en_US
dc.title The effects of combat related stress on learning in an academic environment en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree Doctor of Education en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department Department of Educational Leadership en_US
dc.description.advisor Sarah Jane Fishback en_US
dc.subject.umi Education, Adult and Continuing (0516) en_US
dc.date.published 2010 en_US
dc.date.graduationmonth December en_US


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