The effects of feed budgeting, complete diet blending, and corn supplement blending on finishing pig growth performance in a commercial environment

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dc.contributor.author Frobose, H.L.
dc.contributor.author Ryder, D.
dc.contributor.author DeRouchey, Joel M.
dc.contributor.author Tokach, Michael D.
dc.contributor.author Goodband, Robert D.
dc.contributor.author Nelssen, Jim L.
dc.contributor.author Dritz, Steven S.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-22T17:43:56Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-22T17:43:56Z
dc.date.issued 2010-11-22
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/6552
dc.description.abstract A total of 808 pigs (PIC 337 x 1050, initially 78.4 ± 1.4 lb BW) were used to compare different feed-blending strategies for finishing pigs using the FeedPro system (Feedlogic Corp., Willmar, MN). There were 3 experimental treatments: (1) a standard-phase complete feed program, (2) blending a high- and low-lysine complete diet (curve), and (3) blending ground corn and a supplement. FeedPro is an integrated feed dispensing system that can deliver and blend 2 separate diets while dispensing. Treatment diets were fed over 4 phases (78 to 231 lb BW) with a common complete diet containing Paylean fed during the fifth phase. The 5 phases were from 78 to 115, 115 to 157, 157 to 191, 191 to 239, and 239 to 281 lb. Each treatment had 10 replicate pens and 26 to 27 pigs per pen. Overall (d 0 to 78), pigs phase-fed complete diets had greater (P < 0.01) ADG than pigs fed blended diets and tended to have greater (P < 0.07) ADG than those fed the ground corn-supplement blend. Pigs fed the blended diets had lower (P < 0.001) ADFI than pigs phase-fed complete diets or fed the corn-supplement blend. However, pigs fed blended diets had improved (P < 0.001) F/G compared to pigs phase-fed a ground corn-supplement blend and tended to have improved (P < 0.07) F/G compared to pigs fed standard-phase diets. Pigs fed standard-phase diets had heavier (P < 0.03) HCW than pigs fed the corn-supplement blend and tended to have heavier (P < 0.03) HCW than pigs fed diets on a lysine curve. However, there were no differences (P ≥ 0.11) in percentage yield, percentage lean, fat depth, or loin depth among treatments. There were no differences (P ≥ 0.11) in total revenue or income over feed costs (IOFC) across treatments. However, standard phase-fed pigs held a numerical advantage in total revenue, mainly driven by a heavier HCW over other treatments. Also, pigs fed a ground corn-supplement blend had numerically the lowest IOFC compared to other treatments. In conclusion, feeding using the FeedPro system is competitive with standard phase-fed diets on a net return basis, while feeding a ground corn-supplement blend adversely affected net returns. en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Swine Day, 2010 en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station contribution; no. 11-016-S en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Report of progress (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service); 1038 en_US
dc.subject Swine en_US
dc.subject Carcass characteristics en_US
dc.subject Feed blending en_US
dc.subject Growth en_US
dc.title The effects of feed budgeting, complete diet blending, and corn supplement blending on finishing pig growth performance in a commercial environment en_US
dc.type Conference paper en_US
dc.date.published 2010 en_US
dc.citation.epage 252 en_US
dc.citation.spage 242 en_US
dc.description.conference Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 18, 2010 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jderouch en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid mtokach en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid dritz en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid goodband en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jnelssen en_US


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