Three essays on the relationship between emotions and financial resources

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dc.contributor.author Enete, Shane
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-21T21:51:28Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-21T21:51:28Z
dc.date.issued 2020-12-01
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2097/40877
dc.description.abstract This three-essay dissertation investigated the relationship between emotions and financial resources using a convenience sample of 993 U.S. adults. The broaden and build theory was used in order to predict that emotions help explain variation in the financial resources of U.S. households. Essay one found that emotions were associated with financial resources after controlling for traditional demographic predictors using an ordered logit model. Essay two found that emotions were associated with financial time horizon after controlling for traditional demographic predictors using a structural equation modeling approach. Finally, essay three found that financial time horizon served as a mechanism for helping explain the relationship between emotions and financial resources using a structural equation modeling approach. Results suggest that policymakers, financial professionals, and academics should include emotions as a predictor of financial resources. In addition, future financial positive psychology interventions should use financial time horizon as an important mechanism that may help strengthen the relationship between emotions and financial resources indirectly. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship The dataset was funded and supported by Dr. Russell James III, the CH Foundation chair of Personal Financial Planning, Texas Tech University; and the College of Human Sciences at Texas Tech University. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Positive psychology en_US
dc.subject Finance en_US
dc.subject Emotions en_US
dc.title Three essays on the relationship between emotions and financial resources en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree Doctor of Philosophy en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department Department of Human Ecology-Personal Financial Planning en_US
dc.description.advisor Martin C. Seay en_US
dc.date.published 2020 en_US
dc.date.graduationmonth December en_US


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