Data sets and computer code for: Population genomics of Fusarium subglutinans and Fusarium temperatum from Argentina

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dc.contributor.author Fumero, M. Veronica
dc.contributor.author Yue, Wei
dc.contributor.author Chiotta, María L.
dc.contributor.author Chulze, Sofía N.
dc.contributor.author Leslie, John F.
dc.contributor.author Toomajian, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-24T21:45:07Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-24T21:45:07Z
dc.date.issued 2020-09-24
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2097/40869
dc.description.abstract Fusarium subglutinans and Fusarium temperatum are two important fungal pathogens of maize whose distinctness as separate species has been difficult to assess. We isolated strains of these species from commercial and native maize varieties in Argentina and sequenced >28,000 GBS loci to estimate genetic variation in the sample. Our objectives were to measure genetic divergence between the species, infer demographic parameters related to their split, and describe the population structure of the sample. When analyzed together, over 30% of each species’ polymorphic sites (>2,500 sites) segregate as polymorphisms in the other. Demographic modeling confirmed the species split predated maize domestication, but subsequent between-species gene flow has occurred, with gene flow from F. subglutinans into F. temperatum greater than gene flow in the reverse direction. In F. subglutinans, little evidence exists for substructure or recent selective sweeps, but there is evidence for limited sexual reproduction. In F. temperatum, there is clear evidence for population substructure and signals of abundant recent selective sweeps, with sexual reproduction probably less common than in F. subglutinans. Both genetic variability and the relative number of polymorphisms shared between species increase near the telomeres of all 12 chromosomes, where genes related to plant-pathogen interactions often are located. Our results suggest that species boundaries between closely related Fusarium species can be porous and merit further study. Such porosity could facilitate unanticipated genetic exchange between species and enable quicker permanent responses to changes in the agro-ecosystem, e.g., pathogen-resistant host varieties, new chemical and biological control agents, and agronomic practices. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject Fusarium subglutinans en_US
dc.subject Fusarium temperatum en_US
dc.subject GBS markers en_US
dc.subject species boundary en_US
dc.subject population structure en_US
dc.subject gene flow en_US
dc.title Data sets and computer code for: Population genomics of Fusarium subglutinans and Fusarium temperatum from Argentina en_US
dc.title.alternative Divergence and Gene Flow Between Fusarium subglutinans and Fusarium temperatum isolated from maize in Argentina en_US
dc.type Other en_US
dc.date.published 2020 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jfl en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid toomajia en_US


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