Mechanisms and time-resolved dynamics for trihydrogen cation (H 3 + ) formation from organic molecules in strong laser fields

K-REx Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Ekanayake, Nagitha
dc.contributor.author Nairat, Muath
dc.contributor.author Kaderiya, Balram
dc.contributor.author Feizollah, Peyman
dc.contributor.author Jochim, Bethany
dc.contributor.author Severt, Travis
dc.contributor.author Berry, Ben
dc.contributor.author Pandiri, Kanaka Raju
dc.contributor.author Carnes, Kevin D.
dc.contributor.author Pathak, Shashank
dc.contributor.author Rolles, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Rudenko, Artem
dc.contributor.author Ben-Itzhak, Itzik
dc.contributor.author Mancuso, Christopher A.
dc.contributor.author Fales, B. Scott
dc.contributor.author Jackson, James E.
dc.contributor.author Levine, Benjamin G.
dc.contributor.author Dantus, Marcos
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-17T23:55:07Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-17T23:55:07Z
dc.date.issued 2017-07-05
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2097/40716
dc.description.abstract Strong-field laser-matter interactions often lead to exotic chemical reactions. Trihydrogen cation formation from organic molecules is one such case that requires multiple bonds to break and form. We present evidence for the existence of two different reaction pathways for H3 + formation from organic molecules irradiated by a strong-field laser. Assignment of the two pathways was accomplished through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved strong-field ionization and photoion-photoion coincidence measurements carried out on methanol isotopomers, ethylene glycol, and acetone. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations suggest the formation occurs via two steps: the initial formation of a neutral hydrogen molecule, followed by the abstraction of a proton from the remaining CHOH2+ fragment by the roaming H2 molecule. This reaction has similarities to the H2 + H2 + mechanism leading to formation of H3 + in the universe. These exotic chemical reaction mechanisms, involving roaming H2 molecules, are found to occur in the ~100 fs timescale. Roaming molecule reactions may help to explain unlikely chemical processes, involving dissociation and formation of multiple chemical bonds, occurring under strong laser fields.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-04666-w
dc.rights © 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.uri https://www.nature.com/nature-research/reprints-and-permissions
dc.subject Atomic and molecular interactions with photons
dc.subject Chemical physics
dc.subject Galaxies and clusters
dc.subject Reaction kinetics and dynamics
dc.title Mechanisms and time-resolved dynamics for trihydrogen cation (H 3 + ) formation from organic molecules in strong laser fields
dc.type Text
dc.date.published 2017
dc.citation.doi 10.1038/s41598-017-04666-w
dc.citation.issn 2045-2322
dc.citation.issue 1
dc.citation.jtitle Scientific Reports
dc.citation.spage 4703
dc.citation.volume 7
dc.description.version Article: Version of Record (VoR)


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit Except where otherwise noted, the use of this item is bound by the following: © 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit

Search K-REx


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics








Center for the

Advancement of Digital

Scholarship

cads@k-state.edu