The effects of dietary threonine and porcine somatotropin dosage on nitrogen balance in finishing swine

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dc.contributor.author Swanson, J.A.
dc.contributor.author Schricker, B.R.
dc.contributor.author Li, D.F.
dc.contributor.author Hansen, J.A.
dc.contributor.author Goodband, Robert D.
dc.contributor.author Nelssen, Jim L.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-15T21:41:54Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-15T21:41:54Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04-15T21:41:54Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/3607
dc.description.abstract Fifteen crossbred barrows were utilized to determine the effects of porcine somatotropin (pST) administration in combination with increasing dietary threonine levels on nitrogen retention and growth performance. Barrows averaging 147.3 lb were allotted in a split-plot arrangement with pST dosage (0, 4, or 8 mg/d) as the whole plot, and dietary threonine level (.45, .55, .65, .75, and .85%) as the subplot. These threonine values ranged from 112 to 212% of the dietary threonine estimate for finishing pigs (NRC 1988). All pigs within each pST dosage treatment received each diet for an 8-d period in a Latin square design. Diets were fed for a 4-d adaptation period followed by a 4-d total collection of feces and urine. Pigs were also weighed and bled at the end of each 8-d period. Increasing threonine level increased average daily gain (ADG), reduced feed intake (ADFI), and improved feed efficiency (F/G). Porcine somatotropin had no effect on ADG; however, pigs injected with 4 or 8 mg/d had numerical increases in ADG as threonine level increased. Feed efficiency improved as pST dosage increased. Daily threonine intake increased as dietary threonine level increased. However efficiency of threonine utilization for gain became poorer for control pigs as threonine intake increased, but pST-treated pigs had little change in efficiency of threonine utilization up to the .75 and .85% threonine levels for 4 and 8 mg/d pST dosages, respectively. There was a threonine x pST interaction for plasma urea concentrations, with control pigs having little change in urea concentrations whereas pigs injected with 4 mg/d pST had a decrease then an increase in urea concentrations and pigs injected with 8 mg/d had continual decrease in urea concentrations. Nitrogen retention (g/d) and percent nitrogen retention increased as dietary threonine level increased. However, pigs injected with either 4 or 8 mg/d pST had greater increases in nitrogen retention than control pigs. Biological value also improved as dietary threonine level increased, but again showed a greater improvement for pST-treated pigs than control pigs. These results indicate improvements in growth performance and nitrogen retention for finishing pigs fed increasing threonine levels. However, the data also indicated that the magnitude of response to added threonine was greater for pST-treated pigs, suggesting a possible threonine requirement of approximately .65% or 18 g/d. en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Swine day, 1990 en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station contribution; no. 91-189-S en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Report of progress (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service); 610 en_US
dc.subject Swine en_US
dc.subject Repartition en_US
dc.subject GF en_US
dc.subject Performance en_US
dc.subject AA en_US
dc.subject Nitrogen en_US
dc.title The effects of dietary threonine and porcine somatotropin dosage on nitrogen balance in finishing swine en_US
dc.type Conference paper en_US
dc.date.published 1990 en_US
dc.citation.epage 97 en_US
dc.citation.spage 93 en_US
dc.description.conference Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 15, 1990 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid goodband en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jnelssen en_US


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