Genomic Selection for Processing and End-Use Quality Traits in the CIMMYT Spring Bread Wheat Breeding Program

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dc.contributor.author Battenfield, S. D.
dc.contributor.author Guzman, C.
dc.contributor.author Gaynor, R. C.
dc.contributor.author Singh, R. P.
dc.contributor.author Pena, R. J.
dc.contributor.author Dreisigacker, S.
dc.contributor.author Fritz, A. K.
dc.contributor.author Poland, Jesse A.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-15T15:28:57Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-15T15:28:57Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/35198
dc.description Citation: Battenfield, S. D., Guzman, C., Gaynor, R. C., Singh, R. P., Pena, R. J., Dreisigacker, S., . . . Poland, J. A. (2016). Genomic Selection for Processing and End-Use Quality Traits in the CIMMYT Spring Bread Wheat Breeding Program. Plant Genome, 9(2), 12. doi:10.3835/plantgenome2016.01.0005
dc.description.abstract Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars must possess suitable end-use quality for release and consumer acceptability. However, breeding for quality traits is often considered a secondary target relative to yield largely because of amount of seed needed and expense. Without testing and selection, many undesirable materials are advanced, expending additional resources. Here, we develop and validate whole-genome prediction models for end-use quality phenotypes in the CIMMYT bread wheat breeding program. Model accuracy was tested using forward prediction on breeding lines (n = 5520) tested in unbalanced yield trials from 2009 to 2015 at Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, Mexico. Quality parameters included test weight, 1000-kernel weight, hardness, grain and flour protein, flour yield, sodium dodecyl sulfate sedimentation, Mixograph and Alveograph performance, and loaf volume. In general, prediction accuracy substantially increased over time as more data was available to train the model. Reflecting practical implementation of genomic selection (GS) in the breeding program, forward prediction accuracies (r) for quality parameters were assessed in 2015 and ranged from 0.32 (grain hardness) to 0.62 (mixing time). Increased selection intensity was possible with GS since more entries can be genotyped than phenotyped and expected genetic gain was 1.4 to 2.7 times higher across all traits than phenotypic selection. Given the limitations in measuring many lines for quality, we conclude that GS is a powerful tool to facilitate early generation selection for end-use quality in wheat, leaving larger populations for selection on yield during advanced testing and leading to better gain for both quality and yield in bread wheat breeding programs.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.3835/plantgenome2016.01.0005
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Dough-Mixing Properties
dc.subject Making Quality
dc.subject Genetic-Control
dc.subject Grain
dc.subject Hardness
dc.subject Prediction
dc.title Genomic Selection for Processing and End-Use Quality Traits in the CIMMYT Spring Bread Wheat Breeding Program
dc.type Article
dc.date.published 2016
dc.citation.doi 10.3835/plantgenome2016.01.0005
dc.citation.issn 1940-3372
dc.citation.issue 2
dc.citation.jtitle Plant Genome
dc.citation.spage 12
dc.citation.volume 9
dc.contributor.authoreid jpoland
dc.contributor.kstate Poland, Jesse A.
dc.contributor.kstate Battenfield, Sarah D.
dc.contributor.kstate Battenfield, Sarah D.


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