Food Safety: Recommendations for Determining Doneness in Consumer Egg Dish Recipes and Measurement of Endpoint Temperatures When Recipes Are Followed

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dc.contributor.author Godwin, S.
dc.contributor.author Maughan, Curtis
dc.contributor.author Chambers, Edgar, IV
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-15T15:20:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-15T15:20:24Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/35191
dc.description Citation: Godwin, S., Maughan, C., & Chambers, E. (2016). Food Safety: Recommendations for Determining Doneness in Consumer Egg Dish Recipes and Measurement of Endpoint Temperatures When Recipes Are Followed. Foods, 5(3), 10. doi:10.3390/foods5030045
dc.description.abstract Many consumers do not follow recommended food safety practices for cooking egg dishes, such as pies, quiches, and casseroles, potentially leading to foodborne illnesses such as Salmonellosis. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends cooking egg mixtures until the center reaches 71 degrees C (160 degrees F). The objectives of this study were to determine what endpoint temperature information consumers receive from egg dish recipes, and if recipes would lead to safe temperatures when followed. Egg dish recipes (n = 226) from 65 websites, 50 cookbooks, and nine magazine titles (multiple issues of each) were analyzed. Time was the most frequently used indicator, given in 92% of the recipes, with 15% using only time. Other indicators included: set (89), browned (76), clean toothpick/knife (60), puffed (27), and jiggled (13). Only two recipes indicated final endpoint temperatures. Three recipes (a pie, a quiche, and an egg casserole) were chosen and prepared in triplicate to see if they would reach recommended temperatures. The pie and quiche were still liquid at 71 degrees C, and were well over the recommended temperature when cooked according to instructions, but the egg casserole was not consistently above 71 degrees C, when the recipe instructions indicated it was done and the center was light brown and "jiggled" This research indicates that consumers are not receiving information on endpoint temperatures in egg recipes, but the likelihood of foodborne illness is low since most dishes probably be cooked past the recommended temperature before the consumer considers them done unless there are many inclusions that may absorb liquid and reduce the appearance of liquid in the dish.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5030045
dc.rights Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Consumer Food Safety
dc.subject Egg Dishes
dc.subject Temperature Recommendations
dc.subject Salmonella-Enteritidis
dc.subject Inactivation
dc.subject Resistance
dc.title Food Safety: Recommendations for Determining Doneness in Consumer Egg Dish Recipes and Measurement of Endpoint Temperatures When Recipes Are Followed
dc.type Article
dc.date.published 2016
dc.citation.doi 10.3390/foods5030045
dc.citation.issn 2304-8158
dc.citation.issue 3
dc.citation.jtitle Foods
dc.citation.spage 10
dc.citation.volume 5
dc.contributor.authoreid eciv
dc.contributor.kstate Chambers, Edgar, IV
dc.contributor.kstate Maughan, Curtis


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Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, the use of this item is bound by the following: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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