Determination of the repeatability and accuracy of the Pressed Juice Percentage (PJP) method at sorting beef strip loin steaks into categories of known juiciness

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dc.contributor.author McKillip, Kassandra
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-21T19:24:37Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-21T19:24:37Z
dc.date.issued 2016-05-01 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32578
dc.description.abstract The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of enhancement on consumer and trained beef palatability scores of three quality grades when cooked to three degrees of doneness (DOD) and to determine the accuracy and repeatability of the Pressed Juice Percentage (PJP). Striploins of USDA Prime, Low Choice, and Low Select quality grades were used in this study. To maximize variation in juiciness, steaks were either enhanced (formulated for 108% pump with a solution of water, salt, and alkaline phosphates) or non-enhanced, and cooked to three degree of doneness (Rare: 60°C, Medium: 71°C, or Very Well-Done: 82°C). All samples were evaluated for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), Slice Shear Force (SSF), PJP, and palatability traits by consumer and trained panelists. Consumer panelists rated all enhanced treatments similar (P > 0.05) to each other and greater (P < 0.05) for juiciness, tenderness, flavor liking, and overall liking than all non-enhanced treatments. Consumer ratings of juiciness, tenderness, and overall liking scores increased (P < 0.05) as DOD decreased. Consumer panelists rated all enhanced treatments similar (P > 0.05) and greater (P < 0.05) for the percentage of steaks classified as premium quality. For trained panel initial juiciness, all enhanced treatments and non-enhanced Prime samples were similar (P > 0.05) and greater (P < 0.05) than other treatments cooked to Medium and Very Well Done. Results indicated PJP had a relatively high repeatability coefficient (0.70), indicating that only 30% of the variation observed was due to sample measurement differences. The PJP threshold values evaluated accurately segregated steaks by the probability of a sample being rated “juicy” by consumers, with the actual percentage of “juicy” samples determined to be 41.67%, 72.31%, 89.33%, and 98.08% for the <50%, 50 – 75%, 75 – 90%, and >90% categories, respectively. Therefore, enhancement has a substantial, positive effect on beef palatability. Enhancing higher quality beef does not provide an additional palatability benefit; hence the greatest economic advantage is in enhancing lower quality beef products. Results of this study indicate the PJP juiciness method is both repeatable and accurate at sorting steaks based on the likelihood of a steak being “juicy”. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship National Cattlemen's Beef Association en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University en
dc.subject Animal scienes en_US
dc.subject Juiciness en_US
dc.subject Beef en_US
dc.subject Palatability en_US
dc.subject Consumer testing en_US
dc.title Determination of the repeatability and accuracy of the Pressed Juice Percentage (PJP) method at sorting beef strip loin steaks into categories of known juiciness en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Master of Science en_US
dc.description.level Masters en_US
dc.description.department Department of Animal Sciences and Industry en_US
dc.description.advisor Travis G. O'Quinn en_US
dc.date.published 2016 en_US
dc.date.graduationmonth May en_US


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