Reduction of Energetic Demands through Modification of Body Size and Routine Metabolic Rates in Extremophile Fish

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dc.contributor.author Passow, C. N.
dc.contributor.author Greenway, R.
dc.contributor.author Arias-Rodriguez, L.
dc.contributor.author Jeyasingh, P. D.
dc.contributor.author Tobler, Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-04T22:13:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-04T22:13:47Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32232
dc.description Citation: Passow, C. N., Greenway, R., Arias-Rodriguez, L., Jeyasingh, P. D., & Tobler, M. (2015). Reduction of Energetic Demands through Modification of Body Size and Routine Metabolic Rates in Extremophile Fish. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 88(4), 371-383. doi:10.1086/681053
dc.description Variation in energy availability or maintenance costs in extreme environments can exert selection for efficient energy use, and reductions in organismal energy demand can be achieved in two ways: reducing body mass or metabolic suppression. Whether long-term exposure to extreme environmental conditions drives adaptive shifts in body mass or metabolic rates remains an open question. We studied body size variation and variation in routine metabolic rates in locally adapted populations of extremophile fish (Poecilia mexicana) living in toxic, hydrogen sulfide-rich springs and caves. We quantified size distributions and routine metabolic rates in wild-caught individuals from four habitat types. Compared with ancestral populations in nonsulfidic surface habitats, extremophile populations were characterized by significant reductions in body size. Despite elevated metabolic rates in cave fish, the body size reduction precipitated in significantly reduced energy demands in all extremophile populations. Laboratory experiments on common garden-raised fish indicated that elevated routine metabolic rates in cave fish likely have a genetic basis. The results of this study indicate that adaptation to extreme environments directly impacts energy metabolism, with fish living in cave and sulfide spring environments expending less energy overall during routine metabolism.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1086/681053
dc.rights © 2015 by The University of Chicago
dc.rights.uri http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1522-2152/
dc.subject Adaptation
dc.subject Cave Environments
dc.subject Energy Consumption
dc.subject Extreme Environments
dc.subject Hydrogen Sulfide Springs
dc.subject Poecilia Mexicana
dc.title Reduction of Energetic Demands through Modification of Body Size and Routine Metabolic Rates in Extremophile Fish
dc.type Article
dc.date.published 2015
dc.citation.doi 10.1086/681053
dc.citation.epage 383
dc.citation.issn 1522-2152
dc.citation.issue 4
dc.citation.jtitle Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
dc.citation.spage 371
dc.citation.volume 88
dc.description.embargo Embargo 3/23/2016
dc.contributor.authoreid tobler


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