Intraspecific variation of a dominant grass and local adaptation in reciprocal garden communities along a US Great Plains' precipitation gradient: implications for grassland restoration with climate change

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dc.contributor.author Johnson, Loretta C.
dc.contributor.author Olsen, J. T.
dc.contributor.author Tetreault, H.
dc.contributor.author DeLaCruz, A.
dc.contributor.author Bryant, J.
dc.contributor.author Morgan, Theodore J.
dc.contributor.author Knapp, M.
dc.contributor.author Bello, Nora M.
dc.contributor.author Baer, S. G.
dc.contributor.author Maricle, B. R.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-04T22:13:46Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-04T22:13:46Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/32231
dc.description Citation: Johnson, L. C., Olsen, J. T., Tetreault, H., DeLaCruz, A., Bryant, J., Morgan, T. J., . . . Maricle, B. R. (2015). Intraspecific variation of a dominant grass and local adaptation in reciprocal garden communities along a US Great Plains' precipitation gradient: implications for grassland restoration with climate change. Evolutionary Applications, 8(7), 705-723. doi:10.1111/eva.12281
dc.description Identifying suitable genetic stock for restoration often employs a best guess' approach. Without adaptive variation studies, restoration may be misguided. We test the extent to which climate in central US grasslands exerts selection pressure on a foundation grass big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), widely used in restorations, and resulting in local adaptation. We seeded three regional ecotypes of A.gerardii in reciprocal transplant garden communities across 1150km precipitation gradient. We measured ecological responses over several timescales (instantaneous gas exchange, medium-term chlorophyll absorbance, and long-term responses of establishment and cover) in response to climate and biotic factors and tested if ecotypes could expand range. The ecotype from the driest region exhibited greatest cover under low rainfall, suggesting local adaptation under abiotic stress. Unexpectedly, no evidence for cover differences between ecotypes exists at mesic sites where establishment and cover of all ecotypes were low, perhaps due to strong biotic pressures. Expression of adaptive differences is strongly environment specific. Given observed adaptive variation, the most conservative restoration strategy would be to plant the local ecotype, especially in drier locations. With superior performance of the most xeric ecotype under dry conditions and predicted drought, this ecotype may migrate eastward, naturally or with assistance in restorations.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.12281
dc.rights Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Abiotic Stress
dc.subject Andropogon Gerardii
dc.subject Competition
dc.subject Drought
dc.subject Ecotypic
dc.subject Variation
dc.title Intraspecific variation of a dominant grass and local adaptation in reciprocal garden communities along a US Great Plains' precipitation gradient: implications for grassland restoration with climate change
dc.type Article
dc.date.published 2015
dc.citation.doi 10.1111/eva.12281
dc.citation.epage 723
dc.citation.issn 1752-4571
dc.citation.issue 7
dc.citation.jtitle Evolutionary Applications
dc.citation.spage 705
dc.citation.volume 8
dc.contributor.authoreid johnson
dc.contributor.authoreid tjmorgan
dc.contributor.authoreid nbello


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