Bacteria as drug delivery vehicles

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dc.contributor.author Wendel, Sebastian Oliver
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-19T19:27:59Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-19T19:27:59Z
dc.date.issued 2014-12-19
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/18804
dc.description.abstract Both chemotherapy for cancer treatment and antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections require systemic applications of the drug and a systemic application is always linked to a number of disadvantages. To circumvent these a targeted drug delivery system was developed. It utilizes the ability of phagocytes from the hosts own immune system to recognize and internalize antigens. Deactivated M. luteus, a non-pathogenic gram positive bacteria was loaded with high concentrations (exceeding the IC50 at least 60 fold in local intracellular concentration) the chemotherapeutics doxorubicin or DP44mt or with the bactericidal chlorhexidine. The modified bacteria is fed to phagocytes (Monocytes/Macrophages or neutrophils) and serves as protective shell for the transporting and targeting phagocyte. The phagocyte is recruited to the tumor site or site of infection and releases the drug along with the processed M. luteus via the exosome pathway upon arrival. The chlorhexidine drug delivery system was successfully tested both in vitro and in vivo, reducing the pathogen count and preventing systemic spread of a F. necrophorum infection in a mouse model. The doxorubicin drug delivery system reduced the viability of 4T1 cancer cells to 20% over the course of four days in vitro. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NSF-CBET 1337438 NSF-ECC 1128570 en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University en
dc.subject Drug delivery en_US
dc.title Bacteria as drug delivery vehicles en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree Doctor of Philosophy en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department Department of Chemical Engineering en_US
dc.description.advisor Stefan H. Bossmann en_US
dc.subject.umi Biomedical Engineering (0541) en_US
dc.subject.umi Chemical Engineering (0542) en_US
dc.date.published 2015 en_US
dc.date.graduationmonth May en_US


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