Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) and trypanosomatid prevalence in spring bumble bee queens (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus) in Kansas

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dc.contributor.author Tripodi, Amber D.
dc.contributor.author Cibils-Stewart, Ximena
dc.contributor.author McCornack, Brian P.
dc.contributor.author Szalanski, Allen L.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-11T17:05:30Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-11T17:05:30Z
dc.date.issued 2014-11-11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/18657
dc.description Citation: Tribodi, A., Cibils-Stewart, X., McCornack, B., & Szlanski, A. (2014). Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) and Trypanosomatid Prevalence in Spring Bumble Bee Queens (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus) in Kansas. Journal of the Entomological Society, 87(2), 225-233. https://doi.org/10.2317/JKES130730.1
dc.description.abstract Several species of bumble bees are declining in the United States; these declining populations often show higher prevalence of Nosema bombi, a microsporidian pathogen. To date, surveys of bumble bee pathogens in the United States have only been conducted on workers and males, yet the health of a population is ultimately dependent on the success of colony-founding queens. We conducted a molecular-diagnostic survey of the prevalence of N. bombi and trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia bombi, in six species of spring queens (n  =  142) collected in 2011 and 2013 at three sites in central Kansas. Nosema bombi was found in 27% of Bombus pensylvanicus and 13% of B. auricomus but was not found in the other species sampled. Trypanosomatids were only found in B. pensylvanicus (9%) during the May 2013 sampling period. The high prevalence of N. bombi in B. pensylvanicus is consistent with other surveys for this pathogen in other castes, but the high prevalence of N. bombi in B. auricomus is a novel finding. Although the conservation status of B. auricomus has not been thoroughly assessed, two recently published surveys showed that B. auricomus were less common in portions of the species' range. Based on those findings and an oft-cited link between N. bombi prevalence and bumble bee species' decline (e.g., B. pensylvanicus) in other studies, our findings suggest B. auricomus populations in Kansas may warrant further scrutiny. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.2317/JKES130730.1 en_US
dc.rights Permission to archive granted by Kansas Entomological Society, Sept. 30, 2014. en_US
dc.rights This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).
dc.rights.uri https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/?language=en
dc.subject Bombus en_US
dc.subject Bumble bee en_US
dc.subject Spring queen en_US
dc.subject Nosema bombi en_US
dc.subject Crithidia bombi en_US
dc.subject Kansas en_US
dc.title Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) and trypanosomatid prevalence in spring bumble bee queens (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus) in Kansas en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.date.published 2014 en_US
dc.citation.doi 10.2317/JKES130730.1 en_US
dc.citation.epage 233 en_US
dc.citation.issn 0022-8567
dc.citation.issue 2 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society en_US
dc.citation.spage 225 en_US
dc.citation.volume 87 en_US
dc.citation Tribodi, A., Cibils-Stewart, X., McCornack, B., & Szlanski, A. (2014). Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) and Trypanosomatid Prevalence in Spring Bumble Bee Queens (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus) in Kansas. Journal of the Entomological Society, 87(2), 225-233. https://doi.org/10.2317/JKES130730.1
dc.contributor.authoreid mccornac en_US
dc.description.version Article: Publisher version


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Permission to archive granted by Kansas Entomological Society, Sept. 30, 2014. Except where otherwise noted, the use of this item is bound by the following: Permission to archive granted by Kansas Entomological Society, Sept. 30, 2014.

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