Impact of changes in barometric pressure on landfill methane emission

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dc.contributor.author Xu, Liukang
dc.contributor.author Lin, Xiaomao
dc.contributor.author Amen, Jim
dc.contributor.author Welding, Karla
dc.contributor.author McDermitt, Dayle
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-06T19:36:22Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-06T19:36:22Z
dc.date.issued 2014-11-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/18652
dc.description.abstract Landfill methane emissions were measured continuously using the eddy covariance method from June to December 2010. The study site was located at the Bluff Road Landfill in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Our results show that landfill methane emissions strongly depended on changes in barometric pressure; rising barometric pressure suppressed the emission, while falling barometric pressure enhanced the emission, a phenomenon called barometric pumping. There was up to a 35-fold variation in day-to-day methane emissions due to changes in barometric pressure. Wavelet coherence analysis revealed a strong spectral coherency between variations of barometric pressure and methane emission at periodicities ranging from 1 day to 8 days. Power spectrum and ogive analysis showed that at least 10 days of continuous measurements was needed in order to capture 90% of the total variance in the methane emission time series at our landfill site. From our results, it is clear that point-in-time measurements taken at monthly or longer time intervals using techniques such as the trace plume method, the mass balance method, or the closed-chamber method will be subject to large variations in measured emission rates because of the barometric pumping phenomenon. Estimates of long-term integrated methane emissions from landfills based on such measurements could yield uncertainties, ranging from 28.8% underestimation to 32.3% overestimation. Our results demonstrate a need for continuous measurements to quantify annual total landfill emissions. This conclusion may apply to the study of methane emissions from wetlands, peatlands, lakes, and other environmental contexts where emissions are from porous media or ebullition. Other implications from the present study for hazard gas monitoring programs are also discussed. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013GB004571/full en_US
dc.rights This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. en_US
dc.subject Landfill methane emissions en_US
dc.subject Barometric pressure en_US
dc.subject Barometric pumping en_US
dc.subject Hazard gas monitoring programs en_US
dc.title Impact of changes in barometric pressure on landfill methane emission en_US
dc.type Article (publisher version) en_US
dc.date.published 2014 en_US
dc.citation.doi doi:10.1002/2013GB004571 en_US
dc.citation.epage 695 en_US
dc.citation.issue 7 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Global Biogeochemical Cycles en_US
dc.citation.spage 679 en_US
dc.citation.volume 28 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid xlin en_US


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