Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

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dc.contributor.author Vu, Hieu Sy
dc.contributor.author Roth, Mary R.
dc.contributor.author Tamura, Pamela J.
dc.contributor.author Samarakoon, Thilani Nishanthika
dc.contributor.author Shiva, Sunitha
dc.contributor.author Honey, Samuel
dc.contributor.author Lowe, Kaleb
dc.contributor.author Schmelz, Eric A.
dc.contributor.author Williams, Todd D.
dc.contributor.author Welti, Ruth
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-16T19:08:44Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-16T19:08:44Z
dc.date.issued 2014-05-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/17763
dc.description.abstract Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppl.12132/full en_US
dc.rights This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Vu, H. S., Roth, M. R., Tamura, P., Samarakoon, T., Shiva, S., Honey, S., . . . Welti, R. (2014). Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress. Physiologia Plantarum, 150(4), 517-528., which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppl.12132/full en_US
dc.subject Monogalactosyldiacylglycerols en_US
dc.subject Acyl-galactose en_US
dc.subject acMGDG en_US
dc.subject Stress responses en_US
dc.title Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress en_US
dc.type Article (author version) en_US
dc.date.published 2014 en_US
dc.citation.doi doi:10.1111/ppl.12132 en_US
dc.citation.epage 528 en_US
dc.citation.issue 4 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Physiologia Plantarum en_US
dc.citation.spage 517 en_US
dc.citation.volume 150 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid mrroth en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid ptamura en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid thilani en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid ssunitha en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid welti en_US


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