Longitudinal study comparing the distribution of phenotypically and genotypically similar antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serovars between pigs and their environment in two distinct swine production systems

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dc.contributor.author Keelara, Shivaramu
dc.contributor.author Scott, Harvey Morgan
dc.contributor.author Morrow, William M.
dc.contributor.author Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.
dc.contributor.author Correa, Maria
dc.contributor.author Nayak, Rajesh
dc.contributor.author Stefanova, Rossina
dc.contributor.author Thakur, Siddhartha
dc.date.accessioned 2013-10-10T13:46:57Z
dc.date.available 2013-10-10T13:46:57Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16631
dc.description.abstract The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine and compare the prevalences and genotypic profiles of antimicrobial-resistant (AR) Salmonella isolates from pigs reared in antimicrobial-free (ABF) and conventional production systems at farm, at slaughter, and in their environment. We collected 2,889 pig fecal and 2,122 environmental (feed, water, soil, lagoon, truck, and floor swabs) samples from 10 conventional and eight ABF longitudinal cohorts at different stages of production (farrowing, nursery, finishing) and slaughter (postevisceration, postchill, and mesenteric lymph nodes [MLN]). In addition, we collected 1,363 carcass swabs and 205 lairage and truck samples at slaughter. A total of 1,090 Salmonella isolates were recovered from the samples; these were isolated with a significantly higher prevalence in conventionally reared pigs (4.0%; n = 66) and their environment (11.7%; n = 156) than in ABF pigs (0.2%; n = 2) and their environment (0.6%; n = 5) (P < 0.001). Salmonella was isolated from all stages at slaughter, including the postchill step, in the two production systems. Salmonella prevalence was significantly higher in MLN extracted from conventional carcasses than those extracted from ABF carcasses (P < 0.001). We identified a total of 24 different serotypes, with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella enterica serovar Anatum, Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis, and Salmonella enterica serovar Derby being predominant. The highest frequencies of antimicrobial resistance (AR) were exhibited to tetracycline (71%), sulfisoxazole (42%), and streptomycin (17%). Multidrug resistance (resistance to ≥3 antimicrobials; MDR) was detected in 27% (n = 254) of the Salmonella isolates from the conventional system. Our study reports a low prevalence of Salmonella in both production systems in pigs on farms, while a higher prevalence was detected among the carcasses at slaughter. The dynamics of Salmonella prevalence in pigs and carcasses were reciprocated in the farm and slaughter environment, clearly indicating an exchange of this pathogen between the pigs and their surroundings. Furthermore, the phenotypic and genotypic fingerprint profile results underscore the potential role played by environmental factors in dissemination of AR Salmonella to pigs. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri http://aem.asm.org/content/79/17/5167 en_US
dc.subject Salmonella en_US
dc.subject Swine en_US
dc.subject Antimicrobial resistance en_US
dc.subject Environment en_US
dc.subject Slaughter en_US
dc.subject PFGE en_US
dc.title Longitudinal study comparing the distribution of phenotypically and genotypically similar antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serovars between pigs and their environment in two distinct swine production systems en_US
dc.title.alternative Longitudinal study of distributions of similar antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella serovars in pigs and their environment in two distinct swine production systems en_US
dc.type Article (author version) en_US
dc.date.published 2013 en_US
dc.citation.doi doi:10.1128/AEM.01419-13 en_US
dc.citation.epage 5178 en_US
dc.citation.issue 17 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Applied and Environmental Microbiology en_US
dc.citation.spage 5167 en_US
dc.citation.volume 79 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid hmscott en_US


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