Three essays on self-esteem and retirement planning behaviors

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dc.contributor.author Sages, Ronald Alan
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-16T14:31:03Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-16T14:31:03Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/14953
dc.description.abstract This dissertation, consisting of three studies, explores the influence of self-esteem upon retirement planning behaviors. Data for all three essays was obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY79). A Theory of Self-Esteem (Cast & Burke, 2002) served as a theoretical framework for each study. The first essay examined the association between information search behaviors and retirement planning actions upon two dimensions of self-esteem, consisting of efficacy and worth. Both information search behaviors and retirement planning actions were found to be associated with both dimensions. Attained levels of education and the masculine gender were also found to be significantly associated with each self-esteem dimension. Essay two explored creditworthiness as part of the identity self-verification (Stryker, 1980) and self-esteem buffer mechanism, and its association with pre-retirement planning behaviors. Higher levels of self-esteem, attained level of education, net worth, and net income were all found to be associated with individuals who were likely to engage in one or more preretirement planning behavior. Creditworthy practices, however, were not found to be associated with pre-retirement planning behaviors in this study. Essay three postulated that respondents who possessed a composite psychosocial profile consisting of Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Pearlin’s mastery scale (Pearlin & Schooler, 1978), and Rotter’s locus of control scale (Rotter, 1966) would be associated with engaging in one or more retirement planning behavior. Results showed that a composite psychosocial profile is associated with individuals likely to engage in one or more retirement planning behaviors. Attained levels of education, net worth, net income, and age were found to be associated with individuals likely to engage in one or more retirement planning behaviors. Results of these three studies demonstrate that an association exists between self-esteem and retirement planning behaviors. This study offers the first exploration of A Theory of Self-Esteem (Cast & Burke, 2002) in a consumer finance context since the theory’s establishment ten years ago. These findings are important to academicians, financial planners, financial counselors, financial therapists, and policymakers in developing future research, strategies for financial success, and in the formulation of public policy to promote personal financial well-being. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University en
dc.subject Self esteem en_US
dc.subject Retirement planning en_US
dc.subject Psychosocial profile en_US
dc.title Three essays on self-esteem and retirement planning behaviors en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree Doctor of Philosophy en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department Department of Family Studies and Human Services en_US
dc.description.advisor Sonya L. Britt en_US
dc.description.advisor Maurice M. MacDonald en_US
dc.subject.umi Psychology, Behavioral (0384) en_US
dc.subject.umi Social Research (0344) en_US
dc.date.published 2012 en_US
dc.date.graduationmonth December en_US


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