Browsing Dairy Day, 2003 by Subject "Dairy"

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Browsing Dairy Day, 2003 by Subject "Dairy"

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  • Roberson, J.R. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Mastitis is considered the most costly disease in the U.S. dairy industry. Treatment of clinical mastitis is the major reason for antibiotic contamination of products on U.S. dairy farms. A survey of 183 dairy producers ...
  • Miller, W.F.; Titgemeyer, Evan C.; Park, A.F.; Burgos, M.V.; Hammond, A.K.; Scheffel, Michael V.; Shirley, John E. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    We evaluated the impact on performance of top dressing a based total mixed ration (TMR) with long-stem alfalfa hay with or without additional dry-rolled corn to the lactating cow diet during the first 5 days postpartum. ...
  • Smith, J.F.; Harner, Joseph P.; Brouk, Michael J. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Managing transition cows is a significant problem on dairy farms. The issues include nutritional considerations, stocking rates, metabolic disorders, heat stress, and access to feed and water. Often management of ...
  • Smith, J.F.; Harner, Joseph P.; Brouk, Michael J. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Metabolic disorders and related health problems are a significant problem on dairy farms, resulting in increased culling and decreased profitability for producers. Early detection and treatment of disorders and disease is ...
  • Harner, Joseph P.; Smith, J.F.; Hammond, A.K.; Miller, W.F.; Park, A.F.; Brouk, Michael J. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Reducing heat stress is a key issue for dairy producers. Use of feedline soaking and supplemental airflow effectively reduces heat stress and increases milk production and profitability. High-pressure misting allows ...
  • Burkitt, E.L.; Miller, W.F.; Scheffel, Michael V.; Titgemeyer, Evan C.; Shirley, John E. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Application of an iodophor teat dip before and after milking is a common practice in the dairy industry as an effective method of preventing mastitis by reducing microbial populations at the teat end. Overall effectiveness ...
  • Olson, Jerry D. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    The post-calving period is a critical time in a cow’s life. The first few weeks post-calving pose the highest risk period for a number of diseases including milk fever, mastitis, metritis, pneumonia, retained fetal ...
  • Stevenson, Jeffrey S.; Shirley, John E. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Increased milking frequency during partial or whole lactations increases milk yields, but generally reduces percentages of milk fat and protein. Because of greater milk volume, total fat and protein are not reduced. ...
  • Olson, Jerry (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Disease causing Leptospira can be placed in one of two broad categories for common domesticated mammals: They are either hostadapted or incidental strains. The four incidental serovars of Leptospira that are pathogenic to ...
  • Rosario, B. Macias; McVay, L.; Aramouni, Fadi M.; Schmidt, Karen A. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Milk is widely considered one of the world’s most valuable foods. As a raw material, it is available in various forms, and is found in an ever-increasing variety of nutritional products. Milk is a complex biological fluid ...
  • Shirley, John E. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Dairy cows are generally provided with a 60-day dry period. The first part of the dry period is called the “far-off dry period” beginning at dry off and continuing until 21 days before projected calving date. The second ...
  • Portaluppi, M.A.; Stevenson, Jeffrey S. (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2003)
    Initiation of the Ovsynch protocol at random stages of the estrous cycle produces differences in synchronization and pregnancy rates. Use of two injections of PGF2α administered 14 days apart, with the second ...