Junction City, Manhattan and Topeka, Kansas School Districts 1930-1960: Patterns of Segregation

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dc.contributor.author Wells, Loni
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-19T19:35:30Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-19T19:35:30Z
dc.date.issued 2010-05-19T19:35:30Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/4181
dc.description.abstract Loni Wells analyzes the effect of the historic 1954 Supreme Court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. Examining three cities affected by the ruling – Topeka, Manhattan, and Junction City – she shows that each place had a different reaction. She ties these responses to the historic differences in their African American populations and neighborhoods. Only Junction City had integrated elementary schools and a citywide distribution of black families, whereas Topeka and Manhattan had rigidly-defined and segregated neighborhoods. Newspaper reporting in all three places reflects these differing histories. en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University. Dept. of History. Chapman Center for Rural Studies en_US
dc.subject African American en_US
dc.subject Brown v. Board en_US
dc.subject Topeka en_US
dc.subject Manhattan en_US
dc.subject Junction City en_US
dc.title Junction City, Manhattan and Topeka, Kansas School Districts 1930-1960: Patterns of Segregation en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.description.advisor M.J. Morgan
dc.date.published 2010 en_US
dc.description.course History 533: African American Kansas en_US

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