Molecular aspects of β, β-carotene-9′, 10′-oxygenase 2 in carotenoid metabolism and diseases

K-REx Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Wu, Lei
dc.contributor.author Guo, Xin
dc.contributor.author Wang, Weiqun
dc.contributor.author Medeiros, Denis M.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, Stephen L.
dc.contributor.author Lucas, Edralin A.
dc.contributor.author Smith, Brenda J.
dc.contributor.author Lin, Dingbo
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-23T22:47:56Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-23T22:47:56Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/34662
dc.description Citation: Wu, L., Guo, X., Wang, W., Medeiros, D. M., Clarke, S. L., Lucas, E. A., … Lin, D. (2016). Molecular aspects of β, β-carotene-9′, 10′-oxygenase 2 in carotenoid metabolism and diseases. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 241(17), 1879–1887. https://doi.org/10.1177/1535370216657900
dc.description.abstract Carotenoids, the carotenes and xanthophylls, are essential components in human nutrition. β, β-carotene-9′, 10′-oxygenase 2 (BCO2), also named as β, β-carotene-9′, 10'-dioxygenase 2 (BCDO2) catalyzes the asymmetrical cleavage of carotenoids, whereas β, β-carotene-15, 15′-monooxygenase (BCMO1) conducts the symmetrical cleavage of pro-vitamin A carotenoids into retinoid. Unlike BCMO1, BCO2 has a broader substrate specificity and has been considered an alternative way to produce vitamin A. In contrast to BCMO1, a cytoplasmic protein, BCO2 is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The difference in cellular compartmentalization may reflect the different substrate specificity and physiological functions with respect to BCMO1 and BCO2. The BCO2 gene mutations are proven to be associated with yellow color of skin and fat tissue and milk in livestock. Mutation in intron 2 of BCO2 gene is also supposed to be related to the expression of IL-18, a pro-inflammatory cytokine associated with obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2 diabetes. Further, BCO2 is associated with the development of mitochondrial oxidative stress, macular degeneration, anemia, and hepatic steatosis. This review of the literature will mostly address recent updates regarding the role of BCO2 in carotenoid metabolism, and discuss the potential impacts of BCO2 protein and the mutations in mammalian diseases.
dc.relation.uri http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1535370216657900
dc.rights Copyright 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
dc.rights.uri http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1535-3702/
dc.subject β
dc.subject β-carotene-9′
dc.subject 10′-oxygenase 2
dc.subject Carotenoid
dc.subject Hepatic Steatosis
dc.subject Interleukin 18
dc.title Molecular aspects of β, β-carotene-9′, 10′-oxygenase 2 in carotenoid metabolism and diseases
dc.type Article
dc.date.published 2016
dc.citation.doi 10.1177/1535370216657900
dc.citation.epage 1887
dc.citation.issn 1535-3702
dc.citation.issue 17
dc.citation.jtitle Experimental Biology and Medicine
dc.citation.spage 1879
dc.citation.volume 241
dc.contributor.authoreid wwang
dc.contributor.kstate Wang, Weiqun


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search K-REx


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics








Center for the

Advancement of Digital

Scholarship

118 Hale Library

Manhattan KS 66506


(785) 532-7444

cads@k-state.edu