A comparison of bygholm feed sieve to standard particle-size analysis techniques

K-REx Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Benz, C.K.
dc.contributor.author Groesbeck, C.N.
dc.contributor.author Tokach, Michael D.
dc.contributor.author Nelssen, Jim L.
dc.contributor.author Goodband, Robert D.
dc.contributor.author DeRouchey, Joel M.
dc.contributor.author Dritz, Steven S.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-10-20T15:49:28Z
dc.date.available 2009-10-20T15:49:28Z
dc.date.issued 2009-10-20T15:49:28Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/1866
dc.description Swine research, 2005 is known as Swine day, 2005 en
dc.description.abstract Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the Bygholm Feed Sieve particle size tester. The Bygholm Feed Sieve is an 11 inch × 2.25 inch × 4.25 inch plastic box divided into four compartments by three different screen sizes (3,000-, 2,000-, and 1,000-micron mesh). In Experiment 1, particle size was determined for 20 ground corn samples with a Ro-Tap 13-sieve stack (53- to 3,350-micron Tyler mesh screens).The particle sizes ranged from 543 to 1,741 microns. Samples were analyzed for particle size with the standard Bygholm Feed Sieve, operated according to the manufacturer’s directions. In Experiment 2, two rubber balls were placed on the 2,000 micron screen and one ball was placed on the 1,000 micron screen in the Bygholm Feed Sieve to aid in moving particles through the screens. Samples were then analyzed for particle size, according to the manufacturer’s directions. In Experiment 3, 24 additional samples with particle sizes ranging from 604 to 1,305 microns were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the regression equation created by Experiment 1. After initial analysis indicated that the equation didn’t accurately predict particle size of samples with a large particle size, an additional 11 samples with particle sizes ranging from 1,054 to 1,741 microns were analyzed. After this analysis, all samples from Experiments 1 and 3 were used to develop a new set of regression equations to calculate the particle size of samples over a wider micron range. The Bygholm Feed Sieve more accurately predicted the particle size of samples when rubber balls were not present within the system (R² = 0.88 versus 0.82). The regression equation created by Experiment 1 predicted 90% of the samples to be within 100 microns of the actual particle size when the samples were less than 1,000 microns. When samples are coarser than 1,000 microns, however, the regression equation created by Experiment 3 should be used; it predicts 85% of the samples to be within 100 microns of the actual particle size when the samples were larger than 1,000 microns and 98% of all samples to be within 150 microns of the actual particle size. en_US
dc.publisher Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Swine day, 2005 en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Summary Publication of Report of Progress (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service); 964 en_US
dc.relation.isPartOf Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station contribution; no. 06-63-S en_US
dc.subject Swine en_US
dc.subject Particle size en_US
dc.subject Ground corn en_US
dc.subject Bygholm feed sieve en_US
dc.title A comparison of bygholm feed sieve to standard particle-size analysis techniques en_US
dc.type Conference paper en_US
dc.date.published 2005 en_US
dc.citation.epage 189 en_US
dc.citation.spage 184 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid mtokach en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid dritz en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jnelssen en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid goodband en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid jderouch en_US

Files in this item


Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record