Characterizing prevalence and ecological impact of non-native terrestrial isopods (Isopoda, Oniscidea) in tallgrass prairie

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dc.contributor.author Singer, Caitlin
dc.contributor.author Bello, Nora M.
dc.contributor.author Snyder, Bruce A.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-05T17:52:05Z
dc.date.available 2013-07-05T17:52:05Z
dc.date.issued 2013-07-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/15955
dc.description.abstract Isopods are terrestrial crustaceans whose role and impact in the tallgrass prairie ecosystem remains little explored despite being rather prevalent non-native inhabitants. To better understand this role, we conducted two related studies. The first was a rapid survey of isopods in experimental treatments at Konza Prairie LTER site to investigate the diversity and relative abundance of isopod species present. Of the four species known in Kansas thus far, all non-native, Armadillidium vulgare was the most abundantly found, accounting for 93% of individuals found. Armadillidium nasatum, Cylisticus convexus, and Porcellionides pruinosus were also found and we report the first record of Porcellio laevis in the State of Kansas. Survey results showed no evidence for a relationship between isopod abundance and fire frequency or grazing treatment. The second experiment was a food preference study to explore granivory in non-native isopods and characterize their seed predator behavior on native plants. Individual isopods were placed in Petri dishes with food options including leaf litter and seeds from one of 15 species; dishes were then incubated for 6-12 days and preference was assessed based on pre- and post-trial weights of the feed and individual isopod. Isopods showed a significant preference for leaves compared to seeds in nine of the 15 seed species evaluated; no evidence for leaf-vs.-seed preference was apparent in the remaining six seed species. However, in all cases, isopods did consume some amount of seeds even when leaf litter was present. Taken together, the relatively low abundance of non-native terrestrial isopods and their lack of apparent preference for native plant seeds suggest that isopods are unlikely to pose considerable threat to tallgrass prairie ecosystems. More extensive research, including a preference study with greater representation of seed species and a quantitative survey throughout the year, would be needed to further characterize the ecological role of isopods in the tallgrass prairie. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/10.1163/15685403-00003126;jsessionid=1p4jfcu5em6o4.x-brill-live-01 en_US
dc.subject Isopods en_US
dc.subject Crustaceans en_US
dc.subject Tallgrass prairie en_US
dc.subject Konza Prairie en_US
dc.subject Granivory en_US
dc.title Characterizing prevalence and ecological impact of non-native terrestrial isopods (Isopoda, Oniscidea) in tallgrass prairie en_US
dc.type Article (author version) en_US
dc.date.published 2012 en_US
dc.citation.doi doi:10.1163/15685403-00003126 en_US
dc.citation.epage 1511 en_US
dc.citation.issue 12 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Crustaceana en_US
dc.citation.spage 1499 en_US
dc.citation.volume 85 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid nbello en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid basnyder en_US


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