Representational task formats and problem solving strategies in kinematics and work

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dc.contributor.author Ibrahim, Bashirah
dc.contributor.author Rebello, N. Sanjay
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-26T20:10:19Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-26T20:10:19Z
dc.date.issued 2012-07-26
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2097/14092
dc.description.abstract Previous studies have reported that students employed different problem solving approaches when presented with the same task structured with different representations. In this study, we explored and compared students’ strategies as they attempted tasks from two topical areas, kinematics and work. Our participants were 19 engineering students taking a calculus-based physics course. The tasks were presented in linguistic, graphical, and symbolic forms and requested either a qualitative solution or a value. The analysis was both qualitative and quantitative in nature focusing principally on the characteristics of the strategies employed as well as the underlying reasoning for their applications. A comparison was also made for the same student’s approach with the same kind of representation across the two topics. Additionally, the participants’ overall strategies across the different tasks, in each topic, were considered. On the whole, we found that the students prefer manipulating equations irrespective of the representational format of the task. They rarely recognized the applicability of a ‘‘qualitative’’ approach to solve the problem although they were aware of the concepts involved. Even when the students included visual representations in their solutions, they seldom used these representations in conjunction with the mathematical part of the problem. Additionally, the students were not consistent in their approach for interpreting and solving problems with the same kind of representation across the two topical areas. The representational format, level of prior knowledge, and familiarity with a topic appeared to influence their strategies, their written responses, and their ability to recognize qualitative ways to attempt a problem. The nature of the solution does not seem to impact the strategies employed to handle the problem. en_US
dc.relation.uri http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010126 en_US
dc.rights Published by the American Physical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. en_US
dc.subject Representational task formats en_US
dc.subject Problem solving strategy en_US
dc.subject Physics education en_US
dc.title Representational task formats and problem solving strategies in kinematics and work en_US
dc.type Article (publisher version) en_US
dc.date.published 2012 en_US
dc.citation.doi doi:10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010126 en_US
dc.citation.epage 010126-19 en_US
dc.citation.issue 1 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Physical Review Special Topics -- Physics Education Research en_US
dc.citation.spage 010126-1 en_US
dc.citation.volume 8 en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid srebello en_US
dc.contributor.authoreid bibrahim en_US


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